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Ingersoll, Jared - History

Ingersoll, Jared - History


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Ingersoll, Jared (1722-1781) Stamp Agent, Royalist: Ingersoll was born in Connecticut and studied at Yale, eventually moving to Boston with a British commission to act as a stamp agent for Connecticut, a position which Benjamin Franklin advised him to accept. After the demonstrations against the Stamp Act in various parts of the colonies, Ingersoll, assured of the governor's protection, tried to reason the people of New Haven into forbearance. Surrounding his house, they demanded that he resign as stamp agent. "I know not if I have the power to resign," he replied. He promised, however, that he would re-ship any stamps that he received or leave the matter to their decision. He was finally compelled to offer his resignation, which was not satisfactory to the people of other regions and, in order to save his house from an attack, he rode from New Haven, resolving to place himself under the protection of the legislature in Hartford. Several miles below Wethersfield, Ingersoll met a body of 500 men on horseback, preceded by three trumpeters and two militia officers. They received him and rode with his to Wethersfield, where they compelled him to resign his office. Entering a house for safety, he sent word of his situation to the governor and the assembly. After waiting three hours, the protesters began entering the house and, declaring that "the cause is not worth dying for," Ingersoll agreed to resign. Throwing his hat into the air and shouting "liberty and property" three times, as per the instructions of the crowd, Ingersoll read the agreement he had signed to the assembled patriots. In 1770, he was made admiralty judge of the middle district and lived in Philadelphia for a number of years, until he returned New Haven, where he spent the rest of his life. Unlike his father, Ingersoll's son, Jared Jr., was an active patriot, serving in public office and signing the U. S. Constitution.


Ingersoll, Jared - History

Although Ingersoll was the son of a well-known Loyalist during the Revolution, he rendered meritorious service to Pennsylvania and the United States. Yet he made his greatest mark as a lawyer in Philadelphia, a city that boasted the Nation's most respected bar.

The son of Jared Ingersoll, Sr., a British colonial official and later prominent Loyalist, Ingersoll was born at New Haven, Conn., in 1749. He received an excellent education and graduated from Yale in 1766. He then oversaw the financial affairs of his father, who had relocated from New Haven to Philadelphia. Later, the youth joined him, took up the study of law, and won admittance to the Pennsylvania bar.

In the midst of the Revolutionary fervor, which neither father nor son shared, in 1773, on the advice of the elder Ingersoll, Jared, Jr., sailed to London and studied law at the Middle Temple. Completing his work in 1776, he made a 2-year tour of the Continent, during which time for some reason he shed his Loyalist sympathies.

Returning to Philadelphia and entering the legal profession, Ingersoll attended to the clients of one of the city's leading lawyers and a family friend, Joseph Reed, who was then occupied with the affairs of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania. In 1781 Ingersoll married Elizabeth Pettit (Petit). The year before, he had entered politics by winning election to the Continental Congress (1780-81).

Although Ingersoll missed no sessions at the Constitutional Convention, had long favored revision of the Articles of Confederation, and as a lawyer was used to debate, he seldom spoke during the proceedings.

Subsequently, Ingersoll held a variety of public positions: member of the Philadelphia common council (1789) attorney general of Pennsylvania (1790-99 and 1811-17) Philadelphia city solicitor (1798-1801) U.S. District Attorney for Pennsylvania (1800-01) and presiding judge of the Philadelphia District Court (1821-22). Meantime, in 1812, he had been the Federalist Vice-Presidential candidate, but failed to win election.

While pursuing his public activities, Ingersoll attained distinction in his legal practice. For many years, he handled the affairs of Stephen Girard, one of the Nation's leading businessmen. In 1791 Ingersoll began to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court and took part in some memorable cases. Although in both Chisholm v. Georgia (1792) and Hylton v. United States (1796) he represented the losing side, his arguments helped to clarify difficult constitutional issues. He also represented fellow-signer William Blount, a Senator, when he was threatened with impeachment in the late 1790's.

Ingersoll's long career ended in 1822, when he died less than a week after his 73d birthday. Survived by three children, he was buried in the cemetery of Philadelphia's First Presbyterian Church.

Drawing: Oil (1820) by Charles Willson Peale. Miss Anna Warren Ingersoll, Philadelphia.


Ingersoll was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Jared Ingersoll and Elizabeth Petit. [1] His father served in the Continental Congress and his brother of Joseph Reed Ingersoll served as a member of the U.S. House of Representative for Pennsylvania. His maternal grandfather, Charles Pettit, served as a delegate for Pennsylvania to the Confederation Congress. [2]

Charles Ingersoll dropped out of the College of New Jersey, later Princeton University, in 1799. [3] He then studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1802 and commenced practice in Philadelphia. He traveled in Europe, accompanied by Rufus King, the United States minister to the United Kingdom. [4]

In 1812, Ingersoll was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Thirteenth Congress, where he served as chairman of the United States House Committee on the Judiciary. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1814, having been appointed United States district attorney for Pennsylvania. He served in that office from 1815 to 1829, [5] and was a member of the Pennsylvania canal and internal improvement convention in 1825. In 1829, he was removed from the office of district attorney by U.S. President Andrew Jackson.

In 1815, Ingersoll was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society. [6]

He was a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1830, and a member of the State constitutional convention in 1837. He was appointed secretary of the legation to Prussia on March 8, 1837. He was an unsuccessful candidate in 1837 for election to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Francis J. Harper in the Twenty-fifth Congress. He was again an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1838. [7]

Ingersoll was elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-seventh and to the three succeeding Congresses. He served as chairman of the United States House Committee on Foreign Affairs during the Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth Congresses). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1848. He was appointed Minister to France in 1847 but was not confirmed by the Senate. [8]

He died in 1862 in Philadelphia and is interred at The Woodlands Cemetery. [9]

In 1804, Ingersoll married Mary Wilcocks, the daughter of Alexander Wilcocks, and together had six surviving sons and 2 daughters. [10] His son Edward Ingersoll wrote on legal topics.

  • “Chiomara,” a poem published in The Port Folio (1800)
  • Edwy and Elgira, a tragedy (Philadelphia, 1801)
  • "Right and Wrongs, Power and Policy of the United States of America (1808)
  • Inchiquin the Jesuit's Letters on American Literature and Politics (New York, 1810)
  • “Julian,” a dramatic poem (1831)
  • Historical Sketch of the Second War between the United States and Great Britain (4 vols., Philadelphia, 1845-'52).
  • Recollections, Historical, Political, Biographical, and Social, of Charles J. Ingersoll. Philadelphia: Lippincott & Co., 1861

He also published numerous anonymous contributions to the Democratic Press of Philadelphia, and to the National Intelligencer of Washington, on the controversies with England before the War of 1812 (1811–15). He published several “Speeches” concerning that war (1813–15), a discourse before the American Philosophical Society on the “Influence of America on the Mind,” which was republished in England and France (1823), a translation of a French work on the freedom of navigation, in the American Law Journal of 1829, and many other literary and political discourses. At the time of his death, he was preparing a History of the Territorial Acquisitions of the United States.


Ingersoll, Jared - History

Jared Ingersoll (October 24, 1749 – October 31, 1822) was an early American lawyer and statesman from Philadelphia.

Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Ingersoll was the son of Jared Ingersoll (1722–1781), a prominent British official whose strong Loyalist sentiments would lead to his being tarred and feathered by radical Patriots.

Jared Ingersoll was a supporter of the Revolutionary cause.

His training as a lawyer convinced him that the problems of the newly independent states were caused by the inadequacy of the Articles of Confederation.

He became an early and ardent proponent of constitutional reform, although, like a number of his colleagues at the Constitutional Convention, he believed this reform could be achieved by a simple revision of the Articles.

Only after weeks of debate did he come to see that a new document was necessary.

Shortly after the colonies declared their independence, Ingersoll renounced his family’s views, made his personal commitment to the cause of independence, and returned home.

In 1765, he arrived in Boston from England charged with the commission of stamp agent for Connecticut, a position Benjamin Franklin had advised him to accept.

After the demonstrations against the obnoxious act in various parts of the colonies, Ingersoll, assured of the governor’s protection, tried to reason the people of New Haven into forbearance.

Surrounding his house, they demanded him to resign. “I know not if I have the power to resign,” he replied.

He promised, however, that he would return any stamps that he received or leave the matter to their decision.

He was finally compelled to offer his resignation. His actions not satisfying the people of other sections of Connecticut, he resolved to place himself under the protection of the legislature in Hartford, in order to save his house from an attack.

In 1778 he arrived in Philadelphia as a confirmed Patriot. With the help of influential friends he quickly established a flourishing law practice, and shortly after he entered the fray as a delegate to the Continental Congress (1780–81). In 1781 Ingersoll married Elizabeth Pettit.

Always a supporter of strong central authority in political affairs, he became a leading agitator for reforming the national government in the postwar years, preaching the need for change to his friends in Congress and to the legal community.

Subsequently, Ingersoll held a variety of public positions: member of the Philadelphia common council (1789) attorney general of Pennsylvania (1790-99 and 1811-17) Philadelphia city solicitor (1798-1801) U.S. District Attorney for Pennsylvania (1800-01) and presiding judge of the Philadelphia District Court (1821-22).

Meantime, in 1812, he had been the Federalist Vice-Presidential candidate, but failed to win election.

While pursuing his public activities, Ingersoll attained distinction in his legal practice. For many years, he handled the affairs of Stephen Girard, one of the nation’s leading businessmen.

In 1791 Ingersoll began to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court and took part in some memorable cases.

Although in both Chisholm v. Georgia (1792) and Hylton v. United States (1796) he represented the losing side, his arguments helped to clarify difficult constitutional issues.

He also represented fellow-signer William Blount, a senator, when he was threatened with impeachment in the late 1790s.


Ingersoll, Jared - History

Jared Ingersoll was born on October 24, 1749 in New Haven, Connecticut. His name was from the namesake of his father, Jared Ingersoll, who was known for his dynamic participation as the Connecticut's envoy to London. Jared Ingersoll was a jurist, author and a member of Continental Congress at the same time. Although he was born from the state of Connecticut, he was more known as a state attorney general who served Philadelphia from 1791-1800. Furthermore, he is also the U.S lawyer for Pennsylvania from the years 1800-1801. For a short period of time, he also served as the presiding judge at the Philadelphia district court in the years 1821-1822.

Jared Ingersoll became a delegate to the Continental Congress and affirmed with his signature the U.S Constitution for the state of Pennsylvania. While his father's career was not that successful, Jared Ingersoll managed to take totally different platforms. After he graduated in 1766 from one of the world's most prestigious university, the Yale University, he then decided to go abroad. Before the revolution, he was sent to London as his father told him to do so to further his study at the Middle Temple and to escape the growing political tension at the same time. In the year 1776, he traveled around Europe in favor of independence and disregarded the Loyalist point of views of his father. It is because after his preparation as a lawyer, he was convinced that the problems of each newly independent state in the U.S were the results of insufficiency of the Articles of Confederation.


He went back to Philadelphia in the year 1778 and was confirmed as a Patriot. He received helpful and encouraging support from his very influential friends enabling him to easily establish his own name in the profession. In just a short period of time, he then joined the pursuit as one of the delegate of the Continental Congress during 1780-1781. He had always been an enthusiastic supporter of strong central authority in political affairs. One of his proposals then was primarily for constitutional reforms. Nevertheless, just like some of his fellows at the Constitutional Convention, he firmly believed that his reforms can only be achieved with simple modification of the articles.

After a few weeks of debate, he came to notice that a revised document is highly necessary. Conversely, Ingersoll's main contribution for the cause of constitutional government came not at some point in the Convention itself but sooner during an extensive and illustrious legal career when he facilitated to define most of the principles being enunciated in Philadelphia.

While serving Connecticut, he became an area collector and a supporter of the Stamp Act. But as the conflict from New England began to widely spread, fuming colonist met Ingersoll across the roads outside Hartford. That was the time when protesters stipulated his resignation. Together with the protesters, he publicly surrendered his title. One of the very controversial cases he entered was a landmark case in state's rights where he represented Georgia during Chisholm v. Georgia in the year 1793. The court went against him believing that a state might be sued in the Federal Court by a citizen of the other state. The reversal of this state sovereignty concept was later canceled by the 11th Amendment of the constitution. Being also a representative of Hylton in Hylton v. US in the year 1769, he indulged himself the first challenge to constitutionally of an act of the Congress. With this, the Supreme Court supported the government to implement tax on carriages.

At the Convention, Jared Ingersoll was one of those who affirmed to do some revisions of the existing Articles of Confederation. At the end however, he joined the majority and half-heartedly supported the plan to create a new federal government. Despite his excellent reputation as a lawyer, he do not often participate in the debates in the convention, nonetheless, he was able to consistently attend all of its sessions.

When the new national government was finally established, Jared Ingersoll went back to his profession as a lawyer. Aside from few digressions in some political issues, he became a member of the Common Council of Philadelphia in the year 1789. As a strong federalist in 1800, he considered the election of Thomas Jefferson as a "great subversion". He also joined the Federalist Party running for the position of Vice President with DeWitt Clinton for the U.S presidential election on the year 1812. Unfortunately, James Madison and Elbridge Gerry defeated his vote counts.

This great man from Connecticut, Jared Ingersoll, died in on October 22, 1822 in Philadelphia. He was buried at the First Presbyterian Church cemetery, although the cause of his death is still unknown to this day.


Ingersoll, Jared - History

State: Pennsylvania (Born in Connecticut)

Date of Birth: October 24, 1749

Date of Death: October 31, 1822

Schooling: Yale 1766, Graduated Middle Temple 1776

Occupation: Lawyer, Lending and Investments, Educator

Prior Political Experience: Continental Congress 1780-1781, Attorney General for Pennsylvania 1790-1799, 1811-1817

Committee Assignments: None

Convention Contributions: Arrived May 28 and was present through the signing of the Constitution. William Pierce stated that "Mr. Ingersoll speaks well, and comprehends his subject fully."

New Government Participation: Served as the U.S. District Attorney for Pennsylvania (1800 - 1801).

Biography from the National Archives: The son of Jared Ingersoll, Sr., a British colonial official and later prominent Loyalist, Ingersoll was born at New Haven, CT, in 1749. He received an excellent education and graduated from Yale in 1766. He then oversaw the financial affairs of his father, who had relocated from New Haven to Philadelphia. Later, the youth joined him, took up the study of law, and won admittance to the Pennsylvania bar.

In the midst of the Revolutionary fervor, which neither father nor son shared, in 1773, on the advice of the elder Ingersoll, Jared, Jr., sailed to London and studied law at the Middle Temple. Completing his work in 1776, he made a 2-year tour of the Continent, during which time for some reason he shed his Loyalist sympathies.

Returning to Philadelphia and entering the legal profession, Ingersoll attended to the clients of one of the city's leading lawyers and a family friend, Joseph Reed, who was then occupied with the affairs of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania. In 1781 Ingersoll married Elizabeth Pettit (Petit). The year before, he had entered politics by winning election to the Continental Congress (1780-81).

Although Ingersoll missed no sessions at the Constitutional Convention, had long favored revision of the Articles of Confederation, and as a lawyer was used to debate, he seldom spoke during the proceedings.

Subsequently, Ingersoll held a variety of public positions: member of the Philadelphia common council (1789) attorney general of Pennsylvania (1790-99 and 1811-17) Philadelphia city solicitor (1798-1801) U.S. District Attorney for Pennsylvania (1800-01) and presiding judge of the Philadelphia District Court (1821-22). Meantime, in 1812, he had been the Federalist Vice-Presidential candidate, but failed to win election.

While pursuing his public activities, Ingersoll attained distinction in his legal practice. For many years, he handled the affairs of Stephen Girard, one of the nation's leading businessmen. In 1791 Ingersoll began to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court and took part in some memorable cases. Although in both Chisholm v. Georgia (1792) and Hylton v. United States (1796) he represented the losing side, his arguments helped to clarify difficult constitutional issues. He also represented fellow-signer William Blount, a senator, when he was threatened with impeachment in the late 1790s.

Ingersoll's long career ended in 1822, when he died less than a week after his 73rd birthday. Survived by three children, he was buried in the cemetery of Philadelphia's First Presbyterian Church.


Jared Ingersoll 1749 - 1822

Jared Ingersoll was born in New Haven, Connecticut, the son of the Jared Ingersoll (1722-1781). The elder Jared Ingersoll was known especially for his vigorous pursuit, as Connecticut’s agent to London, of the colonists’ interest in the face of the Stamp Act, and then for his controversial role as the agent who enforced the resulting Stamp Act in Connecticut. In 1767 he accepted an appointment as judge of the vice admiralty court in Philadelphia, but when the Revolution came he was removed from this post by the Revolutionary government.

While the father’s career declined, the son’s career took a very different route. After graduating from Yale University in 1766, young Jared traveled abroad. He then studied law in the office of Philadelphia lawyer Joseph Reed. In the days before the revolution, Jared was sent to London to study law at the Middle Temple. In 1776 he toured the European continent, and shed his father’s Loyalist views in favor of independence.

Soon after Ingersoll’s return to Philadelphia in 1781, he married Elizabeth, the daughter of Charles Pettit. This same year Joseph Reed, Ingersoll’s mentor and now governor of Pennsylvania, asked Ingersoll to look after his law practice. This was the beginning of a long and fruitful career in which Ingersoll became regarded as one of the best lawyers in Philadelphia, at that time home to many of the best legal minds in the country.

In addition to arguing many high profile and important cases, including some in front of the federal Supreme Court, Ingersoll had a successful career in public office. In the early 1780s he served in the Continental Congress, and in 1787 as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. Later, from 1798-1801 he was the City Solicitor. Also, from 1791-1800 and again from 1811-1817, he served as the Attorney General of Pennsylvania. In 1812 he was the Federalist candidate for the vice presidency of the United States. Jared Ingersoll died in 1822, leaving behind several children who would become only somewhat less prominent than their father.

It was as Attorney General that Ingersoll served as an elected trustee and then as an ex-officio trustee of the University of the State of Pennsylvania before the 1791 union which led to the University of Pennsylvania.

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More method acting led to gout and a wheelchair

Apparently, Jared Leto's strange, existential journey of getting into character for his role in Requiem for a Dream didn't deter him from taking on even more challenging, and dangerous, acting roles. Jared swiftly gained a whopping 65 pounds, the equivalent of a large dog, for his role as John Lennon's assassin, Mark Chapman, for the film Chapter 27.

How did he gain that much weight so quickly? He literally chugged pints of microwaved chocolate Häagen-Dazs ice cream twice a day. It's surprising he could gain weight this way, because the average person who did that would be vomiting their calories on the regular. Jared ended up confined to a wheelchair because simply walking became painful, according to DigitalSpy. The experience left Jared doubting if his body would ever get back to where it was prior to the shoot.

Jared ultimately regretted the experience. "Really, it's a stupid thing to do," he told The Guardian. "I got gout, and my cholesterol went up so fast in such a short time that my doctors wanted to put me on Lipitor, which is for much, much older people. Again, though, a fascinating journey." Ever the optimist, Jared Leto saw a diamond among the coal. But did he learn his lesson? Not really.


Ingersoll Serial Numbers and Production Dates

Total Production: Approx. 96 Million Watches

Note that this table should only be used to date non-jeweled Ingersoll "Dollar" watches. Higher-grade Ingersoll watches with jeweled-lever movements used their own serial number sequences.

Year S/N
1892 150,000
1893 310,000
1894 650,000
1895 1,000,000
1896 2,000,000
1897 2,900,000
1898 3,500,000
1899 3,750,000
1900 6,000,000
1901 6,700,000
1902 7,200,000
1903 7,900,000
1904 8,100,000
1905 10,000,000
1906 12,500,000
1907 15,000,000
1908 17,500,000
1909 20,000,000
1910 25,000,000
1911 30,000,000
1912 38,500,000
Year S/N
1913 40,000,000
1914 41,500,000
1915 42,500,000
1916 45,500,000
1917 47,000,000
1918 47,500,000
1919 50,000,000
1920 55,000,000
1921 58,000,000
1922 60,500,000
1923 62,000,000
1924 65,000,000
1925 67,500,000
1926 69,000,000
1927 70,500,000
1928 71,500,000
1929 73,500,000
1930 75,000,000
1931 76,000,000
1932 78,000,000
1933 82,000,000
Year S/N
1934 83,000,000
1935 84,000,000
1936 85,000,000
1937 87,000,000
1938 89,000,000
1939 90,000,000
1940 92,000,000
1941 93,000,000
1942 94,000,000
1943 95,000,000
1944 96,000,000
- -
- -
- -
- -
- -
- -
- -
- -
- -
- -

Be sure to use the serial number on the movement (the works) of the watch. Do not use the serial number from the watch case.

Can’t find your serial number in the table? Click here for an explanation and example of how to use our serial number tables.

Need help finding the serial number on your watch? Click here for instructions on how to identify and open most common case types.


Back in Congress

In 1830, Charles Jared Ingersoll served as a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. In 1837, he was a member of the state constitutional convention. After two failed attempts to get elected to Congress (1837 and 1838), he succeeded in 1841. Serving until 1849, he became chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. His younger brother Joseph Reed Ingersoll – who was married to Mary’s sister Ann Wilcocks – also served in Congress from 1835-37 and 1841-49, as a Whig (Ingersoll was a Democrat).

In 1846, Ingersoll charged his political foe, Daniel Webster, the former Secretary of State, with three counts of official misconduct. Webster was exonerated by a House Committee. The following year, Webster led the Senate in turning down President James Polk’s appointment of Ingersoll as US minister to France. Ingersoll retired from political life and devoted his remaining years to writing.

Charles Jared Ingersoll died in Philadelphia on May 14, 1862 of inflammation of the lungs. He was 79 years old. Ingersoll was buried in the Woodlands cemetery. His obituary notice for the American Philosophical Society, of which he was a member, noted:

Physically, he was slightly made, but of well-turned form and most gentlemanlike appearance. It is said…that when elected to Congress in 1813, then thirty-one years of age, his appearance was so youthful that the doorkeeper at first discredited his assertion that he was a member, and refused him admittance. He looked all his life many years younger than he really was. In his eightieth year he might well have passed for a man of fifty, erect, agile, scarce a hair turned gray or tooth lost. He possessed indeed a most excellent constitution, which he had preserved by the strictest temperance in meat and drink, and by regular exercise…. He retained his intellectual faculties in full vigor up to the time of his death. He was a free and attractive conversationalist, and one could rarely leave a company of which he had been a part, without carrying with him something well thought or well said by him. An Ex-President of the United States…used to say that, when in the vein, Mr. Ingersoll was the most agreeable man he had ever met at a dinner-table. He was affable and courteous to all who approached him…. He was ardent and outspoken as to his political opinions, and thereby gave a handle to his opponents to represent him as radical and extreme, which he never was. (10)

Ingersoll’s son-in-law, the diarist Sidney George Fisher (married to Elizabeth), observed:

His intellect was not of a high order, but he wrote & spoke with ease, animation, and earnestness & was witty at times, generally sarcastic, clever, pointed, odd, never eloquent or profound…. His talents were of a kind that lead to worldly success but not to durable fame. (11)

Ingersoll’s wife Mary died three months later, on August 28, 1862 at the age of 78. She suffered from a debilitating illness during the last five years of her life.


Ingersoll, Jared - History

Jared Ingersoll (October 24, 1749 – October 31, 1822) was an early American lawyer and statesman from Philadelphia.

Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Ingersoll was the son of Jared Ingersoll (1722–1781), a prominent British official whose strong Loyalist sentiments would lead to his being tarred and feathered by radical Patriots.

Jared Ingersoll was a supporter of the Revolutionary cause.

His training as a lawyer convinced him that the problems of the newly independent states were caused by the inadequacy of the Articles of Confederation.

He became an early and ardent proponent of constitutional reform, although, like a number of his colleagues at the Constitutional Convention, he believed this reform could be achieved by a simple revision of the Articles.

Only after weeks of debate did he come to see that a new document was necessary.

Shortly after the colonies declared their independence, Ingersoll renounced his family’s views, made his personal commitment to the cause of independence, and returned home.

In 1765, he arrived in Boston from England charged with the commission of stamp agent for Connecticut, a position Benjamin Franklin had advised him to accept.

After the demonstrations against the obnoxious act in various parts of the colonies, Ingersoll, assured of the governor’s protection, tried to reason the people of New Haven into forbearance.

Surrounding his house, they demanded him to resign. “I know not if I have the power to resign,” he replied.

He promised, however, that he would return any stamps that he received or leave the matter to their decision.

He was finally compelled to offer his resignation. His actions not satisfying the people of other sections of Connecticut, he resolved to place himself under the protection of the legislature in Hartford, in order to save his house from an attack.

In 1778 he arrived in Philadelphia as a confirmed Patriot. With the help of influential friends he quickly established a flourishing law practice, and shortly after he entered the fray as a delegate to the Continental Congress (1780–81). In 1781 Ingersoll married Elizabeth Pettit.

Always a supporter of strong central authority in political affairs, he became a leading agitator for reforming the national government in the postwar years, preaching the need for change to his friends in Congress and to the legal community.

Subsequently, Ingersoll held a variety of public positions: member of the Philadelphia common council (1789) attorney general of Pennsylvania (1790-99 and 1811-17) Philadelphia city solicitor (1798-1801) U.S. District Attorney for Pennsylvania (1800-01) and presiding judge of the Philadelphia District Court (1821-22).

Meantime, in 1812, he had been the Federalist Vice-Presidential candidate, but failed to win election.

While pursuing his public activities, Ingersoll attained distinction in his legal practice. For many years, he handled the affairs of Stephen Girard, one of the nation’s leading businessmen.

In 1791 Ingersoll began to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court and took part in some memorable cases.

Although in both Chisholm v. Georgia (1792) and Hylton v. United States (1796) he represented the losing side, his arguments helped to clarify difficult constitutional issues.

He also represented fellow-signer William Blount, a senator, when he was threatened with impeachment in the late 1790s.


Watch the video: The Rebel and the Tory: Ethan Allen, Phillip Skene, and the Dawn of Vermont (July 2022).


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