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Harry Dobkin

Harry Dobkin


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Harry Dobkin was born in London in 1901. After leaving school he worked in the cloth trade. Dobkin married Rachel Dubinski in 1920. A child was born but the marriage did not last and the couple separated and in 1923 Rachel Dobkin applied for maintenance. Over the next few years Dobkin served several periods in prison as a result of her complaints about his non-payment of maintenance.

Dobkin had a variety of different jobs including that of a tailor, ship's steward and cook. Soon after the outbreak of the Second World War Dobkin found work as a fire-watcher to a firm of solicitors in London.

During the Blitz Dobkin realized that so many people were killed in air raids that it was impossible for the police to investigate every death. Victims were buried quickly and very few post mortems were carried out. In April 1941 Dodkin murdered his wife and buried her under the ruin of Vauxhall Baptist Chapel, hoping she would be discovered as an air raid victim.

The body was not discovered until May 1942. It became clear that the person had not died recently and a pathologist was called in. After examining the body Dr. Keith Simpson argued that the broken bone in the throat suggested that Rachel Dobkin had been strangled. The body was coated in builders' lime. The police came to the conclusion that the murderer had done this to destroy the body. However, he had obviously not known the difference between quicklime and builders's lime, which actually helped to preserve the body.

The jury took only twenty minutes to find Harry Dobson guilty of murder and he was hanged at Wandsworth Prison. This case raised the issue of how many people had been murdered during the war and had been successfully buried in the rubble of bombed out buildings.


Abstract

The increasing role of DNA sampling of the saliva on and around the tooth marks on skin or other objects has perhaps led some to rely on this as too much of a gold standard to the detriment of more established and well-tried methods of odontological forensic detection.

Forensic odontology should not become, as Geoffrey Pyke (1893–1948) the maverick inventor during the Second World War, once described such lost knowledge: “A lesson in collective forgetfulness”. This was said about the use of self sterilizing sphagnum moss as a field dressing due to a content of phenolic compounds. One amongst many of perhaps 350 species of the genus Sphagnum Sphagnum angustifolium, was used as a highly absorbent wound dressing in both World Wars, the Spanish Civil War and before.


What Dobkin family records will you find?

There are 2,000 census records available for the last name Dobkin. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Dobkin census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 1,000 immigration records available for the last name Dobkin. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 538 military records available for the last name Dobkin. For the veterans among your Dobkin ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 2,000 census records available for the last name Dobkin. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Dobkin census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 1,000 immigration records available for the last name Dobkin. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 538 military records available for the last name Dobkin. For the veterans among your Dobkin ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


2. Looting, robbery and theft

A damaged clothing shop in London's West End

People today tend to have a rather rosy-tinted view of life in Britain during the war. The suggestion that looting went on during or after bombing raids usually provokes an incredulous response. Looting certainly did, however, go on, and on a very large scale. During the four months of the London Blitz to the end of 1940, 4,584 looting cases were brought before the judiciary in the Old Bailey, London’s main criminal court. The unhappy owners or occupants of bombed-out dwellings would often return from their air raid shelters to find that the smouldering ruins had been stripped of any surviving valuables. Looting culprits included not only criminals and ordinary citizens but, notoriously, air raid wardens, firemen and other members of the home defence forces. The looters could be manic in their pursuit of spoils. When a famous nightclub in London took a direct hit and many customers were killed, rescuers had to battle through looters who were fighting wildly amongst themselves to reach the dead bodies first and strip them of their jewellery.


Harry Dobkin-Blitz Murderer

One can imaging that the Blitz must have been a terrifying time in Great Britain, but it also must have been a time where people ceased the opportunity amidst the chaos to do things they usually wouldn’t dare to do for the fear of being caught. Harry Dobkin was one of these folks.

Harry Dobkin was born in London in 1901. After leaving school he worked in the cloth trade. Dobkin married Rachel Dubinski in 1920.

A child was born but the marriage did not last and the couple separated and in 1923 Rachel Dobkin applied for maintenance. Over the next few years Dobkin served several periods in prison as a result of her complaints about his non-payment of maintenance.

Dobkin had a variety of different jobs including that of a tailor, ship’s steward and cook. Soon after the outbreak of the Second World WarDobkin found work as a fire-watcher to a firm of solicitors in London.

During the Blitz Dobkin realized that so many people were killed in air raids that it was impossible for the police to investigate every death. Victims were buried quickly and very few post mortems were carried out. In April 1941 Dodkin murdered his wife and buried her under the ruin of Vauxhall Baptist Chapel, hoping she would be discovered as an air raid victim.

On July the 17th 1942 a workman who was helping to demolish the badly bomb-damaged Vauxhall Baptist Chapel in Vauxhall Road, Kennington (now Kennington Lane), prised up a stone slab and found beneath it a mummified body.

The immediate assumption was that the remains were either of an air raid victim or had come from the old burial ground underneath the church, which had ceased to be used some fifty years before. When the church had been bombed on the 15th of October 1940 more than a hundred people had been killed in the conflagration and the area around the chapel had been the target of a number of Luftwaffe raids between that time and March of 1943

Nor was it the first body that the workers had come upon while demolishing the chapel. Nevertheless, routine was followed, and the police were called in, arriving in the persons of Detective Inspectors Hatton and Keeling, the bones being removed to Southwark Mortuary for examination by pathologist Dr Keith Simpson.

Simpson immediately suspected foul play. In trying to raise the bones, the skull had become detached and Simpson realized that the head had already been cut from the body. In addition to this, the limbs had been severed at the elbows and knees, flesh had been removed from the face, the lower jaw was missing and the bones were partially burnt. An obvious attempt had been made to disguise the identity of the corpse.

Dr Simpson obtained the permission of the coroner to take the remains back to his laboratory at Guy’s Hospital for a more detailed inspection.

Returning to the crypt of the church in a vain attempt to find the missing limbs, Simpson noticed a yellowish deposit in the earth, subsequently analysed as slaked lime. This had been used to suppress the smell of putrefaction, but it also had the effect of preventing maggots from destroying the body.

Examining the throat and voice box, Simpson detected a blood clot, strongly indicating death due to strangulation. The next task was to discover the identity of the victim. The body was that of a woman aged between forty and fifty, with dark greying hair, was five feet one inch tall, and had suffered from a fibroid tumour.

Time of death was estimated at between twelve and fifteen months prior to discovery. Meanwhile the police had been checking the lists of missing persons, and noted that fifteen months previously Mrs Rachel Dobkin, estranged wife of Harry Dobkin, the fire watcher at the firm of solicitors next door to the Baptist Chapel at 302 Vauxhall Road, had disappeared.

An interview with her sister elicited the information that she was about the right age, with dark greying hair, was about five feet one tall, and had a fibroid tumour. She also gave police the name of Mrs Dobkin’s dentist, Barnett Kopkin of Stoke Newington, who kept meticulous records and was able to describe exactly the residual roots and fillings in her mouth. They matched the upper jaw of the skull.

Finally, Miss Mary Newman, the head of the Photography Department at Guy’s, super- imposed a photograph of the skull on to a photograph of Rachel Dobkin, a technique first used six years earlier in the Buck Ruxton case.

The fit was uncanny. The bones found in the crypt were the mortal remains of Mrs Rachel Dobkin.

Rachel Dubinski had married Harry Dobkin in September 1920, through the traditional Jewish custom of a marriage broker. Within three days they had separated, but unhappily nine months later a baby boy was born. In 1923 Mrs Dobkin obtained a maintenance order obliging her husband to pay for the upkeep of their child. Dobkin was always a spasmodic payer, and over the years had been imprisoned several times for defaulting. In addition, Mrs Dobkin had unsuccessfully summonsed him four times for assault.

However, it must be said in mitigation of Dobkin’s actions that she habitually pestered him in the street to get her money, and it should be remembered that she was still demanding cash in 1941 when the ‘child’ was twenty years old and hardly a dependant. Dobkin was to hint later that she was also blackmailing him over some undisclosed indiscretion at work.

On Good Friday, the 11th of April 1941, Dobkin and his wife had met in a cafe in Kingsland Road, Shoreditch, near to where he lived in Navarino Road, Dalston, E8. They left at 6.30 and she was never seen alive again, though he claimed that she had boarded a No.22 bus to visit her mother. Next day Rachel’s sister reported her missing to the police, implicating Harry Dobkin in the process. Because of the priorities of war, Dobkin was not interviewed about the disappearance until April the 16th.

On the night of the 14th a small fire had broken out in the ruined cellar of the Baptist Church. This was peculiar, because there had been no air raids and the blaze was only noticed at 3.23am by a passing policeman. When the fire brigade arrived Harry Dobkin was there, pretending to put it out. He told the constable that the fire had started at 1.30am and that he hadn’t bothered to inform the authorities because there was little danger of the fire spreading. There was a serious air raid on the next night, so the incident was quickly forgotten. Dobkin was interviewed twice more about his wife’s disappearance and a description and photograph were circulated by the police but no further action was taken.

On the 26th of August 1942, Dobkin was interviewed for the first time by Chief Inspector Hat ton, and escorted to the church cellar, where he vehemently denied any involvement in his wife’s death. He was then arrested for her murder.

The trial of Harry Dobkin opened at the Old Bailey on the 17th of November 1942, with Mr Justice Wrottesley presiding and Mr L.A. Byrne prosecuting. Dobkin’s counsel, Mr F.H. Lawton, spent most of his efforts trying vainly to challenge the identification evidence. The prisoner’s appearance in the witness box left the jury unimpressed, and it took them only twenty minutes to arrive at a verdict of guilty.

Before his execution Dobkin confessed to his wife’s murder, claiming that she was always pestering him for money and he wanted to be rid of her for good. On the 7th of January, 1943, Harry Dobkin was hanged behind the walls of Wandsworth Prison.

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Barbara Dobkin

Jewish feminist philanthropist Barbara Berman Dobkin.

Photograph courtesy of HUC-JIR.

Barbara Berman Dobkin is the pre-eminent Jewish feminist philanthropist of the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century. Her vision, dedication, and philanthropic generosity have transformed the landscape of Jewish women’s organizations and funding in both North America and Israel. Her belief in the importance of zedakah began early her zedakah began modestly but grew quickly as her family’s wealth increased. Her approach to philanthropy is practical, strategic, and rooted in the desire to leverage the leadership of women she is a stronger believer in funding social change. She has made significant contributions to the arts, progressive political causes, and a wide range of films that focus on feminism and social justice.

Barbara Berman Dobkin is the pre-eminent Jewish feminist philanthropist of the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century. Her vision, dedication, and philanthropic generosity have transformed the landscape of Jewish women’s organizations and funding in both North America and Israel. She has also made significant contributions to the arts, progressive political causes, and a wide range of films that focus on feminism and social justice.

In her central pursuit of the full equality and integration of women and women’s issues into every aspect of Jewish life, Dobkin co-founded Ma’yan: The Jewish Women’s Project, served as the founding chair of the Jewish Women’s Archive and the Hadassah Foundation, and was the board chair of American Jewish World Service. She has also been a pioneering donor-activist on Jewish gay and lesbian issues, in progressive Israeli organizations, and in the U.S. women’s funding movement, and she has garnered a national reputation as a speaker on issues of women’s philanthropy and leadership

Born on December 17, 1943, Barbara Berman grew up in the Jewish community of Baltimore, Maryland with her brother Geoffrey. Her mother, Ida, was a homemaker and social worker and her father, Samuel, was a businessman and civil servant. As a high school student, Barbara was the president of her class and an activist in local civil rights struggles. She received her B.A. from Marietta College in Ohio in 1965 and earned a Master’s of Social Work from Boston University in 1967. Barbara met her husband Eric Dobkin at Marietta and they married in 1965. Eric Dobkin was named a partner of Goldman Sachs & Co. in 1982. In 1985, he founded the Equity Capital Markets Group, through which he managed many of the world’s largest corporate financings. Barbara and Eric Dobkin have two daughters—Rachel, born in 1968, and Jessica, born in 1970.

Though she was not born into a wealthy family, Barbara Dobkin’s belief in the power of the Jewish obligation of Lit. "righteousness" or "justice." Charity zedakah for all Jews regardless of their income developed when she was a child. She credits her grandmother, who was the neighborhood “key-holder” for the Jewish National Fund zedakah boxes, as an early influence on her in this arena. Dobkin’s zedakah began modestly but grew steadily as her family’s wealth increased. She quickly became known as someone who “puts her money where her mouth is.” By 2001, Dobkin had given away over one million dollars, primarily through the Dobkin Family Foundation, of which she has been the driving force.

Dobkin’s earliest volunteer involvements included her local Parents-Teachers Association and the League of Women Voters, for which she became the New York chapter’s leading fundraiser and helped secure its first build in Albany, New York. During that time, she also supported the Yonkers’ battered women’s shelter, Westchester Jewish Community Services, and UJA-Federation of New York.

Dobkin’s approach to philanthropy is practical, strategic, and rooted in the desire to leverage the leadership of women. She consistently supports projects that aim to raise the status of Jewish women and build the self-esteem of Jewish women and girls, and she never shies away from controversy or risk. She is a strong believer in funding social change, focusing on institutions that address the root causes of social ills rather than those that manage crises and do not alter the status quo. Dobkin’s belief that the arts, including music, film, and theater, provide creative vehicles for education and social change has led her to fund many social justice documentary films, as well as cultural projects including Women in Hollywood and ReelAbilities, the largest festival in the United States dedicated to promoting awareness and appreciation of the lives, stories, and artistic expressions of people with different disabilities.

Dobkin takes seriously her role as mentor to peers and younger women on using money as a tool for social change, and she has facilitated workshops for younger women on these issues. She addresses audiences all over the United States, inspiring women to educate themselves to be competent and comfortable with money, urging shared philanthropic priority-setting and decision-making among people of all genders, and setting an example of the need to back up priorities and ideals with funding.

In the 1990s, spurred on by her frustration with the lack of financial support among both Jews and non-Jews for projects that specifically target women and girls, Dobkin helped catalyze a movement of Jewish women dedicated to funding issues such as women’s spirituality, education and leadership, girls’ programming, body image and eating disorders, lesbian issues, and violence against women. She consulted with numerous individuals and organizations and worked to increase the communication and collaboration between various funding initiatives throughout the United States. The Dobkin Family Foundation organized and made possible the first national gatherings of Jewish Women’s Foundations in 2001 that grew into the Jewish Women’s Funding Network.

In 1994, Dobkin approached her long-time friend Eve Landau and asked her to join her in founding a new initiative to further the status of women in the Jewish community. This initiative became Ma’yan: The Jewish Women’s Project, a program of the Jewish Community Center in Manhattan. Ma’yan’s mission—to serve as a catalyst for change in the Jewish community in order to create an environment more inclusive and responsive to women, their needs, and their experiences—was furthered through spiritual, educational, and leadership programs. During Ma’yan’s first years of existence, Dobkin was not only the sole funder of the organization and its first chairperson, but also worked as a full-time unpaid staff member, doing everything from organizing feminist seders for hundreds of women to stuffing envelopes. Dobkin’s hands-on and characteristically unpretentious approach helped shape the character of Ma’yan as an organization to which hundreds of Jewish women turned for guidance, inspiration, and resources for their Jewish feminist activism until its closure in 2017.

In addition to her commitment to a vibrant Jewish future transformed by women’s participation, Dobkin has a passion for preserving Jewish women’s history. An avid amateur collector of women’s books and ephemera, Dobkin was profoundly inspired to preserve Jewish women’s history after meeting Gail Twersky Reimer in 1994. With Reimer as the founding executive director and Dobkin as its chairperson, the Jewish Women’s Archive (JWA) became a national organization that uncovers, chronicles, and transmits the history of Jewish women’s lives.

In a sign of her deep commitment to the Jewish community and her refusal to give up on mainstream Jewish organizations’ potential to embody their ethical ideals, Dobkin, through her family foundation, made a grant of one million dollars to the newly formed Trust For Jewish Philanthropy of the United Jewish Communities to fund “Advancing Women Professionals and the Jewish Community.” This initiative, launched in February 2001 and spearheaded by Jewish feminist activist Shifra Bronznick, aimed to achieve gender equity within Jewish institutions, federations, and other Jewish social service organizations. On December 31, 2015, AWP formally closed, but its partners and allies continue to drive the work of gender equity and shared leadership in the Jewish community and beyond.

Dobkin has also been a trend-setting philanthropist in the arena of gay and lesbian issues, co-founding, at the Jewish Community Center in Manhattan, one of the first specifically Jewish groups for parents of gays and lesbians in the United States, providing the seed money for an innovative program for gay and lesbian teenagers run by Westchester Jewish Community Services, and being an important backer of Jewish gay and lesbian films and other projects.

Dobkin is particularly beloved among first-wave Israeli feminists for her enduring financial support and enthusiastic embrace of their work. Through US/Israel Women to Women, the New Israel Fund, and many personal relationships, Dobkin has helped Israeli feminist organizations grow stronger and become known to North American audiences. Dobkin has also contributed significantly to Israeli peace organizations, educational initiatives for women within academia and within progressive yeshivot, and programs seeking to equalize opportunity among Israel’s diverse citizens. Among the numerous organizations Dobkin has supported are the Israel Women’s Network, Kol Ha’isha—the women’s center in Jerusalem, Isha L’isha: Haifa Feminist Organization, Claf: Community of Lesbian Feminists in Israel, NISAN: Young Women Leaders, and Bat Shalom. In May 2002, Dobkin established the Jewel Bellush Award through US/Israel Women-to-Women, a $1,000 annual prize awarded to an Israeli woman who is a leader in the feminist movement and a contributor to social change on behalf of women.

As a significant supporter of and advisor to a variety of not-for-profit organizations both Jewish and secular in the United States and in Israel, Dobkin has served on numerous boards, including Lilith Magazine, the Women’s Donors Network, the New Israel Fund, the Jewish Funders Network, the White House Project, and the Sister Fund. Among the many other organizations Dobkin has supported are the Ms. Foundation for Women, Emily’s List, Bend the Arc, and Auburn Seminary.

Over the course of her 40 years as a philanthropic activist, Dobkin has received numerous awards from the New York Women’s Foundation, the Jewish Funders’ Network, the Jewish Book Council, and the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

Dobkin once wrote, “I use my voice, my influence and my money to benefit Jewish women and girls. To me this is a sacred mission.” Certainly this “sacred mission” is one that has touched the lives of countless women and left its mark on the Jewish and feminist communities in the United States and Israel.

Astrinsky, Elinoar, Interview of Barbara Dobkin, The Center for the Study of Women and Society Oral History Project, 1997.

Dobkin, Barbara. “Giving as Justice,” Ma’yan Journey, vol. 1, no. 1, Fall 1997.

“Donor Profile: Barbara Dobkin.” Women’s Funding Network Newsletter, Winter 2001.

Faingold, Noma. “Philanthropist Earmarks Jewish Women’s Causes.” Jewish Bulletin of Northern California, February 20, 1998.


Comment

I follow the blog of Angela Buckley - who I believe was one of the experts consulted on the first episode. Haven't seen it myself but definitely would be interested.

Thanks for that Erobitha She appears in the programmes.

I just looked in the book section and saw that she’s written four. I actually have the first one but the other three also look interesting (I’ll be adding them to my list of possible booms to buy.)

“All conspiracy theories are the product of the subconscious attempt of an ignorant yet creative mind to counteract the fear of the unknown with the tales of fantasy.” Abhijit Naskar.

“Conspiracy theorists, she knew, were paranoid by definition, and usually with good reason - they were indeed being watched, largely because they were standing on an upturned bucket, haranguing the sheeple with their wingnut delusions.” Mick Herron.

”The most confused you will ever get is when you try to convince your heart and spirit of something your mind knows is a lie.” Shannon L. Alder.


Singer and pioneering lesbian activist Alix Dobkin dies at 80

NEW YORK (AP) — The lesbian singer and feminist activist who appeared in an iconic and recently resurgent 1975 photo wearing a t-shirt that read “The Future is Female,” has died. Alix Dobkin of Woodstock, New York, was 80.

An early leader in the music scene for lesbians and women, she passed away at her home from a brain aneurysm and stroke, according to Liza Cowan, her friend, and former partner.

“Everything that she did was about being a public lesbian in the world,” said Cowan, who also took the striking photo.

In 1973, Dobkin formed the group Lavender Jane with musician Kay Gardner. With an all-women team of musicians, engineers, and even vinyl pressers, they recorded the album “Lavender Jane Loves Women” — the first-ever to be entirely produced by women, Cowan said.

Dobkin had been performing in the folk music scene in Philadelphia and New York in the 1960s, where she mingled with future superstars like Bob Dylan, according to her 2009 memoir “My Red Blood.” The title references her parents’ and her own membership in the Communist party.

When she came out as a lesbian, she forged ahead musically as an early leader and then mainstay of Women’s Music, a genre made by, for, and about women. The genre fostered a whole network of publications, recording labels, venues, and festivals starting in the 1970s.

“She became an iconic, kind of bigger-than-life figure for women who identified as lesbians,” said Eileen M. Hayes, author of the book “Songs in Black and Lavender,” a history of Black women’s involvement in the movement.

Dobkin sang songs like “Lesbian Code,” which playfully lists the many ways women interested in women identify each other. She also had a version of the alphabet song that begins, “A, you’re an Amazon.” Dobkin, who was Jewish, often played Yiddish songs during her performances and told stories she had heard growing up in Philadelphia.

She often performed for all-women audiences. An undated flyer advertising one of Dobkin’s shows explained all-women concerts offered women the opportunity “to come together to develop our culture as part of the process of taking control of our lives.” It asked men who supported the struggle against sexism not to attend.

A friend and collaborator, Kathy Munzer, produced shows for lesbians in Chicago for more than 30 years and called Dobkin “The Head Lesbian,” saying in a Facebook post that she inspired others to take pride in who they were.

Before the AIDS epidemic, lesbian and gay organizations operated separately, Hayes said. A prominent women’s festival where Dobkin played for years, the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, excluded transwomen from attending. In 2000, Dobkin wrote in defense of cis-women-only spaces while also seeking out conversations with transwomen and defending the right of everyone to love and be themselves.

“I especially worry about the narrowing of women’s identity and the erasure of women’s history. For voicing these considerations we have been attacked as ‘bigoted,’ ‘transphobic’ and worse, but are these not credible concerns?” she wrote in a column in the Windy City Times.

Reflecting on the fight about cis-women-only spaces, Hayes said at the beginning of the women’s movement, “it was a statement about, who is this movement supposed to benefit the most?”

The choice to create a parallel media ecosystem also reflected how difficult it was for women to break into the mainstream music industry, Hayes said.

“It didn’t support women as performers, and singers, and engineers and advertising people,” Hayes said. “It’s still very hard for women to break into the industry.”

Hayes called the newfound fame of the slogan “The Future is Female” and the reemergence of the photo of Dobkin “fabulous.”

The slogan originated from a woman’s bookstore in New York, Labyris Books, that had screenprinted a small run of the shirts, Cowan said. She photographed Dobkin wearing one for an article she was writing about lesbian fashion. An Instagram post in 2015 by @h_e_r_s_t_o_r_y, an account that chronicles lesbian history, featured the image. That inspired an unaffiliated company to print the T-shirts again and eventually introduced the slogan to a new generation, according to the New York Times.

“What we’ve learned through the women’s movement is that, yeah, the future is female, but it’s not a uni-dimensional female,” Hayes said. “It’s a female identity that is constructed with various threads, various backgrounds, and that is the corrective our new generation makes to the failings of earlier generations.”

In the weeks before her death, Dobkin’s family kept a public diary about her health that drew thousands of comments from friends and fans. They wrote of how Dobkin’s music provided them comfort, guidance, and community.

“And still you bring us together again, wonderous woman you are. ” read one comment.

Before coming out as a lesbian, Dobkin married Sam Hood, whose father owned a folk music venue in New York where she had played. Dobkin is survived by him, their daughter, Adrian, and three grandchildren, among other family members, former partners, and fans.

As a historian and witness to the women’s movement, Hayes said she was grateful to have had Dobkin’s musical and political leadership.

“I think that the death of Alix Dobkin just reminds us of how far we’ve come in terms of LGBTQ right to life,” she said. “And right to life as in the right to be.”

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Harry’s Bar

On May 13, 1931, Giuseppe Cipriani Senior opened Harry’s Bar in Venice. Over the years, Harry’s Bar became the place where writers, painters, artists, aristocrats, kings and queens would meet. Among them there were: Barbara Hutton, Katherine Hepburn, Gary Cooper, Giancarlo Menotti, Peggy Guggenheim, Orson Welles, Frank Lloyd Wright, Joe di Maggio, Truman Capote and Ernest Hemingway. The keys to the success of this tiny Bar were: service, freedom and lack of imposition.

Please fill out the form below and a Cipriani representative will follow up shortly

The atmosphere of the restaurant, the warm immediacy of it, the company always of people who know each other, the ease of converse, the somehow knowing attitudes of the staff, all these add up to the club like feeling that all the best European cafés possess. Throughout its 89 years’ history, Harry's Bar has been the witness of the XX century in Venice. Its importance was also acknowledged by the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage that declared it a National Landmark in 2001. No other public place in Italy had received the same award in the same Century.


Harry Reid Confirms Federal Government Covered Up UFOs For Years

Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said the U.S. government has been hiding key details about UFOs for years.

“Why the federal government all these years has covered up, put brake pads on everything, stopped it, I think it’s very, very bad for our country,” Reid said in the new documentary “The Phenomenon” from director James Fox.

“Are you saying that there’s some evidence that still hasn’t seen the light of day?” asked Fox.

“I’m saying most of it hasn’t seen the light of day,” Reid replied.

The film examines the history of UFO sightings in the United States and abroad, including new details about the military-confirmed encounters off the coast involving U.S. Navy pilots. It also details a 1967 report in which an object appeared over a U.S. missile base at the same time 10 of the missiles became inoperative.

“If they had been called upon by the president to launch, they couldn’t have done it,” Reid said in the film.

Reid, who was among the lawmakers behind a classified but since-closed U.S. government UFO program, has become increasingly outspoken about the phenomena since leaving office. However, he stopped short of confirming evidence of other-worldly activity, writing in August on Twitter that he wants the issue studied and that “we must stick to science, not fairy tales about little green men.”

He repeated that point of view in the new film.

“Nobody has to agree why it’s there. But should we at least be spending some money to study all these phenomenon?” he asked. “The answer is ‘yes.’”

UFO expert Lee Speigel, a former HuffPost reporter, served as a co-writer and co-producer on the film, which he said took seven years to come to fruition.

“Whether you’re a UFO ‘believer’ or debunker, those in-between or still undecided, it’s important to present accurate information that potentially affects the national security of all nations and the safety of all citizens of our planet,” Spiegel said.

“The Phenomenon” is currently available via VOD.


Watch the video: Разумков унизил Зеленского и его Слуг как тупых ослов (May 2022).